If you have driven by Southern Columbia Area's School District's campus recently, you may have noticed a bevy of activity related to the Guaranteed Energy Savings Project approved by the Board of Education this past spring. The project will net the District over $4 million in energy savings over the next twenty years while allowing it to make much needed facility repairs. Headed by the McClure Company, the project includes districtwide lighting upgrades, "plug load" management, building envelope upgrades, HVAC upgrades and roofing upgrades.  The following provides an overview of each component of the project:

Plug Load Management- devices will be installed in the District's buildings to allow for increased control over computer workstations during non-use periods. Through a combination of “smart” outlets, control management equipment, and software integration, this system will allow for work stations, and other devices using the outlet, to be powered down based on un-occupancy, idle use, or a master operation schedule. Monitoring and controlling energy consumption is an important step in improving a facilities overall efficiency. Currently there is no plug load management system implemented in the School District.

Lighting Upgrade- a lighting audit conducted in the District’s buildings revealed a total of 3,736 fixtures that contained a variety of lighting technologies ranging from the inefficient incandescent to the more energy efficient T8 and compact fluorescent.  Out of the 3,736 fixtures, 363 fixtures were found to be the most energy efficient fixture available. Most of the remaining fixtures are in good serviceable condition and are well maintained with minimal lamp or ballast outages. These fixtures will be retrofitted with a reduced wattage lamp and energy efficient ballast.  A total of 127 new fixtures will be installed replacing those fixtures in poor condition or in need of improved energy savings performance. 

Building Envelope Upgrades- this part of the project is commonly called “weatherproofing.”  The project will reduce the amount of air infiltration and increase insulation in the High School/Middle School, the G.C. Hartman Elementary School/Administration Building and the Bus Garage. Even the smallest cracks or penetrations can have a significant impact on the annual heating and cooling energy consumption.  This part of the project will include air sealing roof wall interfaces and roof edges and weather stripping doors and exhaust fans.

High School HVAC Upgrades- Southern Columbia Area High School was originally constructed in 1961. It had major additions added in 1999 and 2010, bringing the total building size to approximately 175,000 square feet. The original HVAC heating system of the building was steam served by two oil-fired steam boilers. Steam was then distributed throughout the building utilizing the under floor crawl space. Largely, the steam system utilized pneumatic controls to adjust the temperature set points of the system, which is inefficient and maintenance intensive. In 1999, a second HVAC heating system was added to serve a newly added middle school section; a hot water system. The hot water was created by installing a steam to hot water heat exchanger in the boiler room. Hot water was created from the steam and was pumped to the ancillary heating equipment located in the new section. For the most part, the hot water system uses a DMS pneumatic overlay to adjust the temperature set points of the system. In 2010, a third heating system was added to serve a second middle school addition; a hot water/glycol water system. This system, similar to the hot water system, also utilizes a steam to hot water/glycol heat exchanger in the boiler room. The hot water/glycol mix was heated by a steam to hot water/glycol heat exchanger in the boiler room. The hot water/glycol mix was heated by the steam and was circulated to the building heating units through a set of inline pumps. The hot water glycol system utilizes direct digital controls (DDC) to adjust the temperature set points of this system. 

The energy study found the High School's steam heating system to be far beyond its useful life in addition to being very inefficient.  Twenty-six high school classrooms were served by the original steam system. Heat and ventilation air was delivered to the classrooms by floor mounted unit ventilators with steam coils. The steam system also served a variety of large group spaces, including the weight room, wood shop, metal shop, auxiliary gym, lobby, wrestling room, faculty rooms, corridors, restrooms, storage rooms, computer rooms, auditorium, and guidance office suite. The classroom units and the steam terminal units serving these spaces will be replaced. 

The aforementioned high school classrooms (and twelve middle school classrooms) will be served by vertical packaged heat  pumps (Airedale Classmate). These are high efficient vertical heat pumps with a hot water auxiliary coil. The unit is capable of heating and cooling each classroom. Each unit will contain an internal heat recovery wheel, which will reduce energy use associated with introducing required outside ventilation air. 

The High School's domestic hot water system was served by the steam boilers and hot water storage tank during heating season and a “summer” oil-fired domestic water heater and smaller storage tank during the remainder of the year. The hot water storage tank, originally installed in 1960s, will be replaced. The existing pneumatic control system will be replaced with a new open protocol, direct digital control (DDC) automation system capable of integrating into the existing digital control systems already in place in the facility.

Both steam boilers will be removed and replaced with two high efficiency dual fuel boilers. The oil fired “summer” domestic water heater and smaller storage tank will be tied into a high efficient propane tankless water heating system. This will give the District the flexibility to utilize either fuel type to meet its domestic heating water needs.

The boilers will be tied into a new hot water header. The existing hot water system will be tied into the header. The glycol system will be converted to hot water and tied in the hot water header as well. Two base mounted pumps will be installed with variable frequency drives. This will allow the pumps to be more energy efficient since they will be able to vary the flow to the system based on the heating needs. The existing steam equipment throughout the building will be replaced with hot water equipment. 

Middle School HVAC Upgrades- The "original" Southern Columbia Area Middle School was built in 1999. The building  was designed to be heated by a hot water HVAC system utilizing a hot water piping distribution system.  Twelve  (12) middle school classrooms were served by the hot water system. Heat and ventilation air was delivered to the classrooms by floor mounted unit ventilators with hot water coils. Like the high school classrooms already mentioned, these twelves classrooms will be equipped with an Airedale Classmate high efficient vertical heat pump.

G.C. Hartman Elementary Center HVAC Upgrades- The Elementary building was designed to be heated by a hot water HVAC system utilizing an overhead hot water piping distribution system served by two oil-fired York Shipley boilers located in the mechanical room. An oil-fired domestic water heater boiler and storage tank was installed for the Elementary domestic water heating. The domestic water is served by the steam boilers and hot water storage tank during heating season and a “summer” oil-fired domestic water heater during the remainder of the year. The hot water storage tank, originally installed in 1970s, was found to be in need of replacement. 

Both boiler oil-fired burners will be replaced with dual fuel burners, capable of burning fuel oil or propane. The domestic water system will be repurposed for a dual fuel application. The oil-fired “summer” domestic water will be tied into a high efficient propane tankless water heating system and an additional 200 gallon storage tank. This will give the district the flexibility to utilize either fuel type to meet the domestic heating water needs. 

High School Roofing Upgrade- The high school roof is a combination of hot tar buildup and EPDM roof. Select areas of the roof are leaking and starting to cause damage inside the school. Other deficiencies found include: 

• Debris under EPDM membrane 

• Failed lap sealant 

• Open lap seams 

• Areas of soft/wet insulation 

• Protruding fastener heads 

• Loose wall flashings / term bar 

• Loose repair patches 

• Holes / Slices in the Membrane 

Sections of the roof will either be repaired or replaced. Leaking areas in the hot tar buildup that are getting repaired will be patched and all loose counter flashing, edging, t-bar and piping will be reflashed and sealed. Areas in the EPDM roof that need to be replaced will be removed down to the steel deck and new R-20 ISO insulation and 090 white EPDM will be installed on top. Other areas that are still in good shape will be washed and one coat of primer and top coating will be applied to give the roof at 10 year material warranty in those areas. 

Elementary Roof Upgrade- Similar to the High School/Middle School, the Elementary School is also in immediate need of a roof replacement. Water has been able to penetrate the roof and get into the insulation beneath it. This causes a loss in R-Value from the insulation and weakens the integrity of the roof. Leaks have also been noticed in the school which causes more repairs to be made beyond the roof itself. Other deficiencies found include: 

• Debris under EPDM membrane 

• Failed lap sealant 

• Open lap seams 

• Areas of soft/wet insulation 

• Protruding fastener heads 

• Loose wall flashings / term bar 

• Holes in the Membrane 

The old EPDM roof and insulation will be removed down to the gypsum deck on the original building and down to the steel deck on the new addition. A 6 mil poly vapor over gypsum deck will be installed. 3.25” of R-20 ISO insulation and 090 white EPDM with a 30 year total system roof warranty will also be installed. In addition to the insulation and EPDM roof, new 050 aluminum coping and edging, and aluminum replacement roof drains will be installed. 

 

   The oil-fired boilers serving the High School have been removed and will soon be replaced by more energy efficient, dual fuel burners, capable
of burning fuel oil or propane. 
 

Special Features

Parents and other school community members are encouraged to share their viewpoints about key educational issues, particularly those concerning digital learning and the use of technology to support future ready schools, by participating in the Speak Up Project for Digital Learning, facilitated by Project Tomorrow.  The annual national research project gives education stakeholders the opportunity to ensure their voice is heard not only at Southern Columbia, but at the state and national level as findings are summarized aLearn More

Take a look back at the summer 2017 facility renovation projects and check on the progress of the Tiger Stadium project via Sway's storyline. Summer projects through August 27, 2017. Tiger Stadium- Start to PresentBefore and After PicturesLearn More

Southern Columbia Area High School eaned lifetime status as National Blue Ribbon School in 2016, being named a National Blue Ribbon School for Exemplary High Performing School. Click the links below to read more about the school's National Blue Ribbon Schools award recognition. Learn More